UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
———————
FORM 10-K
———————
 
(Mark One)
þ  ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010
¨  TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _______ to __________.

Commission File No: 333-88480

———————
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
———————

Delaware
90-0577933
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

489 5th Ave., 28th Floor
New York, NY 10017
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

212-682-8452
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None
Securities registered under to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ¨  No þ

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨  No þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for past 90 days. Yes þ  No ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's  knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   Yes þ  No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

(Check One): Large accelerated filer ¨ Accelerated filer ¨ Non-accelerated ¨ Smaller reporting company þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ¨  No þ

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was sold at March  31, 2010 was $12,688,369. For purposes of this disclosure, shares of common stock held by persons who hold more that 10% of the outstanding shares of common stock and shares held by executive officers and directors of the registrant have been excluded because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. The determination of executive officers or affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

At January 13, 2011, the registrant had 39,702,580 shares of Common Stock outstanding.
 
 
 

 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Part I
       
  Item 1 Description of Business 2
       
  Item 1A Risk Factors 7
       
  Item 2 Description of Property 15
       
  Item 3 Legal Proceedings 15
       
  Item 4 Removed and reserved 15
       
Part II
       
  Item 5 Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholders Matters and Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities 16
       
  Item 6 Selected Financial Data 17
       
  Item 7 Managements’ Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 17
       
  Item 7A Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 21
       
  Item 8 Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 21
       
Part III
       
  Item 9 Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 39
       
  Item 9A Controls and Procedures 39
       
  Item 10 Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 40
       
  Item 11 Executive Compensation 42
       
  Item 12 Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 44
       
  Item 13 Certain Relationships, Related Transactions, and Director Independence 46
       
  Item 14 Principal Accountant Fees and Services 46
       
Part IV
       
  Item 15 Exhibits 47
       
   
Certification made pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.
 Exhibits 31 
       
   
Certification made pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.
Exhibits 32
 
 
 

 
 
Part I
 
ITEM 1
BUSINESS
 
Our discussion and analysis of the business and subsequent discussion of financial conditions may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Statements that are not historical in nature, including statements about beliefs and expectations, are forward-looking statements. Words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “believes,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “expects,” “intends” and similar expressions are intended to identify these forward-looking statements, but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements. Such statements are based on currently available operating, financial and competitive information and are subject to various risks and uncertainties as described in greater detail in our “Risk Factors” on page 5 of this Annual Report. You are cautioned that these forward-looking statements reflect management’s estimates only as of the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update these statements, even if new information becomes available or other events occur in the future. Actual future results, events and trends may differ materially from those expressed in or implied by such statements depending on a variety of factors, including, but not limited to those set forth in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Specifically, and not in limitation of these factors, we may alter our plans, strategies, objectives or business.
 
We are a reporting company and file annual, quarterly and special reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. You may read and copy any reports, proxy statements or other information that we file at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street N.E., Room 1580, Washington, D.C., 20549. You can also request copies of these documents by writing to the SEC and paying a fee for the copying costs. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for more information about the operation of the public reference room. Our public filings with the SEC are also available on the web site maintained by the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.
 
General and Historical
 
Summary
 
Ohr Pharmaceutical, Inc. (“we”, “Ohr”, the “Company” or the “Registrant”) is a Delaware corporation that was organized on August 4, 2009, as successor to, BBM Holdings, Inc., (formerly Prime Resource, Inc., which was organized March 29, 2002) pursuant to a reincorporation merger.
 
The Company is a biotechnology rollup company currently focused on development of the Company’s previously acquired compounds. With the addition of our executive management team in April 2010, we have shifted our strategy accordingly to focus on the development of our two later stage lead products, OHR/AVR118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia (multi-symptom wasting disorder), and Evizon® (Squalamine) for the treatment of the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. We acquired OHR/AVR118 in a secured party sale and Evizon®(Squalamine) from the Genaera Liquidating Trust as part of the Company’s previous strategy to create a rollup of undervalued biotechnology companies and assets.
 
On March 19, 2009, the Company acquired in a secured party sale all the patents, related intellectual property, clinical data and other assets related to AVR118 (also known now as OHR/AVR118). OHR/AVR118 is in an ongoing Phase II trial for the treatment of cachexia. The Company also exercised its option to acquire the new technology and early stage pharmaceutical compounds from Dr. S. Z. Hirschman, who joined the Company as a consultant and Chief Scientific Advisor.
 
The Company acquired OHR/AVR118 and related assets in a secured party sale with $100,000 in cash and $500,000 principal amount of 11% convertible secured non-recourse debenture due June 20, 2011  convertible into common stock at $0.40 per share (the “Convertible Debenture”). The Convertible Debenture was repaid on December 29, 2010. The cash portion of the purchase price was financed by short-term loans from an affiliate of Orin Hirschman and another current shareholder, which were repaid June 3, 2009.
 
On August 19, 2009, the Company completed the acquisition of Squalamine, Trodusquemine and related compounds from Genaera Liquidating Trust. The Company paid $200,000 in cash for the compounds.

 
2

 

On April 12, 2010, Dr. Irach Taraporewala was hired as the Company’s full-time CEO and Sam Backenroth was hired as the Company’s Vice President of Business Development and Interim CFO. In connection with their employment, Mr. Limpert resigned as an officer of the Company.
 
Historical
 
The Registrant under its former name “Prime Resource, Inc.” completed a public offering of 150,000 shares of its Common Stock in July 2002. Historically, Prime Resource, Inc. was primarily engaged in group insurance brokerage as well as investment and pension consulting, through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Belsen Getty, LLC and Fringe Benefit Analysts, LLC.
 
On April 30, 2006, Prime Resource, Inc. transferred substantially all of its assets, essentially becoming a “shell company” without any active business purpose or active business assets. On March 22, 2007, the Registrant changed its name to “BBM Holdings, Inc.” (BBM). On March 30, 2007 (the "Effective Date"), Prime Acquisition, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Registrant, merged with and into Broadband Maritime, Inc. (“Broadband”), a company providing broadband internet service and international telephone service for the maritime industry. On June 5, 2007, the Registrant announced that it ceased operations and reduced employment to a small residual force.
 
As of April 30, 2006, substantially all the assets (other than approximately $35,000 of cash or other liquid assets and common stock and warrants to purchase common stock of Lightspace Corporation  (the "Lightspace Securities"), having an approximate value of $372,000 as of September 30, 2006) and liabilities of Prime Resource, Inc. were transferred to a private business entity controlled by the principal shareholders of Prime Resource, Inc. (pre-Merger) in exchange for a reduction in the number of the Registrant's shares held by such shareholders and other consideration.
 
On March 30, 2007 (the "Effective Date"), Prime Acquisition, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Registrant, merged with and into Broadband (the “Merger”), and the stockholders of Broadband received Common Stock of the Registrant. As a result of the Merger, Broadband was the surviving corporation and the Registrant's only wholly-owned subsidiary and, formerly, its sole operating entity. Broadband was a telecommunications engineering and service company offering turnkey, always-on Internet access to commercial shipping fleets. For purposes of accounting, Broadband was treated as the accounting acquirer and as such these financial statements present the former operations of Broadband for all periods presented. Immediately prior to the Merger, the Registrant was a “shell company” that did not have any active business purpose or active business assets.
 
In connection with the Merger, the Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant were amended on March 22, 2007, to (1) change its name to "BBM Holdings, Inc." and (2) increase the total authorized capital stock of the Registrant to 60,000,000 shares, of which 50,000,000 shares were designated common stock, no par value, and 10,000,000 shares were designated preferred stock, no par value, of which 1,454,090 shares of the Preferred Stock were designated Series A Preferred Stock (the "Series A Stock"). Prior to the Merger, the Registrant paid a dividend of one share of Series A Stock per share of Common Stock outstanding. Each share of Series A Stock represents the right to exchange such share for a pro rata share (among the issued and outstanding Series A Stock) of whatever right, title and interest is held in the  Lightspace Securities.. This prorata distribution of the Lightspace Securities took place on June 30, 2008 and the Series A Stock was cancelled.
 
In addition, in connection with the Merger, the Registrant changed its fiscal year from December 31 to September 30.
 
The merger (reverse acquisition) described above has been accounted for as a purchase business combination in which Broadband was the acquirer for accounting purposes and BBM was the legal acquirer. No goodwill has been recognized since BBM was a “shell company.”
 
Broadband, formerly ePCX.com Inc., was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware. It was formed as a New Hampshire corporation in November 1999. Until June, 2007, Broadband was a US-based telecommunications service provider. Broadband developed a broadband internet service and international telephone service for the maritime industry.

 
3

 

Discontinued Operations and Divestment of Assets
 
On June 5, 2007, the Company announced that it ceased its Broadband operations and reduced employment to a small residual force. The Company received notification of the cancellation of two customer contracts on May 22, 2007 and May 28, 2007, respectively. In addition, the Company’s largest customer announced that it would suspend further installations of systems on its vessels for a four-month period.  The Company also received notification of the cancellation of a third customer contract on June 1, 2007.
 
On May 31, 2007, Mary Ellen Kramer and Zevi Kramer resigned as directors of the Company effective as of such date. The resignations of Ms. Kramer and Mr. Kramer were not related to any disagreement between them and the Company on any matter relating to the Company’s operations, policies or practices. Ms. Kramer continued to serve as the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer of the Company until November 1, 2007, the closing of the sale of Broadband’s remaining assets. The Company negotiated with substantially all of its current vendors to obtain a release of long-term obligations. On October 16, 2007, the Company agreed to sell substantially all of its assets (primarily intellectual property and technology) relating to broadband services to ships to private investors for $460,000 pursuant to an asset purchase agreement (the “Asset Purchase Agreement”). The Company completed the transaction on November 1, 2007, after receiving stockholder approval required under Utah corporate law. In conjunction with the completion of the asset sale, BBM’s major customer has agreed to release the Company of its obligation to pay accrued commissions of $45,000 as well as agreeing to withdraw its claim of $420,000
 
Continuation of Company as a Pharmaceutical Company
 
On March 19, 2009, the Company acquired in a secured party sale all the patents, related intellectual property, clinical data and other assets related to AVR118 (renamed OHR/AVR118). OHR/AVR118 is in an ongoing Phase II trial for the treatment of cachexia. The Company also exercised its option to acquire the new technology and early stage pharmaceutical compounds from Dr. S. Z. Hirschman, who joined the Company as a consultant and Chief Scientific Advisor.
 
The Company acquired the assets in the secured party sale with $100,000 in cash and by issuing a $500,000 principal amount 11% convertible secured non-recourse debenture due June 20, 2011, and convertible at $0.40 per share (the “Convertible Debenture”). The Convertible Debenture is secured by the acquired assets. The cash portion of the purchase price was financed by short-term loans from an affiliate of Orin Hirschman, a director of the Company, and another current shareholder. The Convertible Debenture was paid in full on December 29, 2010.
 
On June 3, 2009, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the Company sold 5,583,336 series B preferred shares with 5,583,336 Series G Warrants and 5,583,336 Series F Warrants attached. Each share of preferred stock has the same voting rights of common shareholders and has a conversion feature where series B preferred shares can be converted into common shares at the conversion rate of 1 to 1. Warrants included in each unit sold have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.18.
 
On August 19, 2009, the Company completed the acquisition of Squalamine, Trodusquemine and related compounds from Genaera Liquidating Trust. The Company paid $200,000 in cash for the compounds.
 
On December 15, 2009, investors exercised 5,583,336 Series G warrants via a cashless exchange for 4,547,238 shares of the Company’s common stock.
 
On January 15, 2010, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the company issued 5,583,336 common shares to holders of the series F Warrants who exercised their warrants at an exercise price of $0.18. Additionally, as an inducement to the holders to exercise the Warrants, the Company issued 5,583,336 Series H warrants to the Series F warrant holders who exercised their Series F warrants. The Series H Warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.55.
 
On April 12, 2010 the Company hired Dr. Irach Taraporewala as CEO and Sam Backenroth as Vice President of Business Development and Interim CFO. In connection with the new hires, Andrew Limpert resigned as an officer of the Company.
 
On December 30, 2010 the Company sold 4,200,000 shares of common stock to a group of institutional and accredited investors for gross proceeds of $1,050,000. In addition, the investors received 2,520,000 five year warrants to purchase common stock at an exercise price of $0.55 per share.

 
4

 
 
Until the Company is able to generate significant revenue from its principal operations, it will remain classified as a development stage company. The Company can give no future assurance that it will be successful in such efforts or that its limited operating funds will be adequate to continue the Company as a public company, nor is there any assurance of any additional funding being available to the Company. Our independent accountants have qualified their audit report by expressing doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a “going concern.”
 
Product Pipeline
 
OHR/AVR118
 
OHR/AVR118 is a novel immunomodulator with a singular chemical structure that is terminally sterilized and endotoxin-free.  The compound is composed of two small peptides, Peptide A, that is 31 amino acids long, and Peptide B, which is 21 amino acids long. Peptide B is unique in that the dinucleotide, diadenosine, is covalently attached to serine at position 18 through a phosphodiester bond. OHR/AVR118 is quite stable and has a very favorable safety profile both in animal toxicity studies and in human clinical trials.
 
Ohr is currently conducting a Phase II clinical trial of OHR/AVR 118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia at a leading cancer center in Canada. Cancer cachexia is a severe wasting disorder characterized by weight loss, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness, and significant loss of appetite. This disorder is often seen in late stage cancer patients. OHR/AVR118 has also shown to have chemoprotective effects, thus potentially allowing patients to better tolerate chemotherapy and radiation as well as more intensive treatment regimens with ordinary toxic chemotherapeutic agents, while maintaining body weight and avoiding other side effects. There is currently no FDA approved drug for the treatment of cancer cachexia. The company presented interim data on this current trial at the annual conference of the Society of Cachexia and Wasting Disorders in Barcelona, Spain in December 2009.  
 
Squalamine
 
Squalamine is a systemic intracellular, anti-angiogenic drug with a novel mechanism of action. Its ophthalmic formulation, Evizon®, has been evaluated against the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (“wet-AMD”), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, which affects over 200,000 new patients a year in the US alone.  
 
In Phase II trials, in which no drug-related ocular or systemic effects were observed, stabilization or improvement in visual activity was observed in the vast majority of patients, with both early and advanced lesions responding. In a significant number of patients that had a more advanced wet AMD-affected eye (“fellow eye”), who were not candidates for therapy with the currently approved wet-AMD drug therapy, the administration of Squalamine produced beneficial effects in this non-treatable AMD-affected fellow eye as well.  As opposed to the current approved standard of therapy, Evizon® does not require direct injection into the eye.  In addition, Evizon®’s novel mechanism of action avoids the systemic and ophthalmic side effects associated with intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (“VEGF”) antibodies.
 
Additionally, because of its potent anti-angiogenic effects and secondary mechanisms of action, Squalamine also shows promise in the treatment of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer. In a concluded Phase IIa study, patients with stage III and IV refractory and resistant ovarian cancer received Squalamine in conjunction with another chemotherapeutic agent with approximately two thirds of the patients achieving a complete response, partial response or stable disease. In 2001, Squalamine was awarded Orphan Drug Status by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) for the treatment of late stage refractory and  resistant ovarian cancer. Because of funding constraints, Ohr is seeking a development partner to further advance development of this indication.
 
Ohr also owns various other compounds in earlier stages of development that it will seek to develop further through a strategic partnership or on a sponsored basis.
 
As consideration for Dr. Hirschman for the sale of the pre-clinical compounds, the Company issued to Dr. Hirschman, a five-year warrant, issuable on the closing of the acquisition, exercisable for up to 5,000,000 shares of the Company’s Stock at an initial exercise price of $.50 per share (the “Hirschman Warrant”) and entered into a certain Registration Rights Agreement, which provides for certain registration rights in connection with the shares of the Company’s Common Stock issuable upon exercise of the Hirschman Warrant (the “Registration Rights Agreement”). Dr. Hirschman is the father of Orin Hirschman, a beneficial owner through AIGH Investment Partners, LLC of approximately 13.89% of the outstanding Common Stock of the Company.
 
5

 

Reincorporation
 
On August 3, 2009 the Company merged with and into its subsidiary, Ohr Pharmaceutical, Inc. (“Ohr”). Under the terms of the merger agreement, Ohr became the surviving corporation in the merger. Each outstanding share of BBM common stock was converted into one share of Ohr common stock. Each outstanding share of BBM Series B convertible preferred stock was converted into one share of Ohr Series B convertible preferred stock. Additionally, all outstanding BBM options and warrants were assumed and converted into equivalent Ohr warrants or options and maintained substantially identical terms. Finally, each outstanding share of Ohr stock owned by BBM immediately prior to the effective date of the merger ceased to be outstanding and was cancelled and retired.
 
Material Subsequent Events
 
On October 29, 2010 the Company was awarded a $244,479 grant under the IRS Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project (QTDP) program, which was created by Congress as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The Company will use the grant, which will be paid over the next 12 months, to advance the development of its lead program, OHR/AVR 118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia, currently being investigated in a phase II trial.
 
On December 14, 2010 the Company announced the opening of a new clinical site for its ongoing Phase II clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of OHR/AVR118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia at the Ottawa Hospital Centre.
 
On December 29, 2010  the Company paid $54,740.01 on the secured convertible debenture to YA Global Investments. The amount represents the full repayment of all outstanding principal and interest on the debenture. In accordance with the terms of the Debenture and Security Agreement, YA Global Investments has released all liens and claims against the Company.
 
On December 30, 2010 the Company sold 4,200,000 shares of common stock to a group of institutional and accredited investors for gross proceeds of $1,050,000. In addition, the investors received 2,520,000 five year warrants to purchase common stock at an exercise price of $0.55 per share.
 
Competitive Factors
 
The pharmaceutical industry is characterized by intense competition and confidentiality. We may not be aware of the other biotechnology, pharmaceutical companies or public institutions that are developing pharmaceuticals that compete with our potential products. We also may not be aware of all the other competing products our known competitors are pursuing. In addition, these biotechnology companies and public institutions compete with us in recruiting for research personnel and subjects, which may affect our ability to complete our research studies. Current treatment of cachexia is limited to steroid based therapeutics and nutritional supplements but there are various other companies developing investigational drugs in Phase 1 and 2 trials for the treatment of cachexia. We cannot assure that none of them will get to market before us or that OHR/AVR118 will be a better treatment. Lucentis® is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of wet-AMD. There is no assurance that we can get FDA approval for Squalamine for the treatment of wet-AMD, and if we get it, there is no assurance we will be able to displace Lucentis® as a treatment in a significant amount of patients. In addition there are various other companies with drugs in Phase 1, 2 and 3 trials for the treatment of wet-AMD. We cannot assure that none of them will get to market before us or that Squalamine will be a better treatment. See “Risk Factors” below.
 
Number of Persons Employed
 
At present, the Company has two full-time employees. On April 12, 2010, the Company hired Dr. Irach Taraporewala, CEO, and Sam Backenroth,Vice President of Business Development and Interim CFO. Andrew Limpert resigned as an officer of the Company upon the hiring of Dr. Taraporewala and Mr. Backenroth. Details about Dr. Taraporewala and Mr. Backenroth’s employment can be found in the Company’s Form 8K filed with the SEC on April 12, 2010.
 
Additionally, as discussed above, Dr. S. Z. Hirschman has been appointed as a consultant and Chief Scientific Advisor to the Company effective March 20, 2009. He provides scientific and strategic direction to the Company as it explores potential pharmaceutical partnerships and furthers the development of its pipeline of compounds.

 
6

 

Environmental Compliance
 
The Company is not aware of any environmental claims or liabilities.
 
Governmental Compliance
 
Until the Company is able to generate significant revenue from its principal operations, it will remain classified as a development stage company. As such, OHR will continue to be subject to various SEC and state securities rules and regulations. Its OTC Bulletin Board listing will also be subject to various rules and regulations by the OTC Bulletin Board. The foregoing is not meant to be exclusive, and the Company will continue to be subject to various generic governmental regulations, such as tax filing and reporting requirements, OSHA compliance, etc. See “Risk Factors” below.
 
ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS.
 
You should carefully consider the following factors which may affect future results of operations. If any of the adverse events described below actually occur, our business, financial condition and operating results could be materially adversely affected and you may lose part or all of the value of your investment. If you choose to invest in our securities, you should be able to bear a complete loss of your investment.
 
There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern due to our cash requirements which means that we may not be able to continue operations unless we obtain additional funding.
 
Our independent registered public accounting firm’s report on our financial statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010 includes an explanatory paragraph regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. Conducting our clinical trials will require significant cash expenditures and we do not have the funds necessary to complete all phases of our clinical trials nor do we currently have sufficient number of shares of capital stock authorized to sell securities to raise the capital to complete the trials required to continue or complete the development of our products, which raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.
 
Based on our current plans and capital resources, we believe that our cash and cash equivalents will be sufficient to enable us to meet our minimum planned operating needs through December 2011. Our ability to continue as a going concern will depend upon our ability to obtain debt or equity financing for funds to meet our cash requirements. No assurance can be given that debt or equity financing will be available. Concern about our ability to continue as a going concern may place additional constraints on operations and make it more difficult for us to meet our obligations or adversely affect the terms of possible funding. If our financial condition worsens and we become unable to attract additional equity or debt financing or other strategic transactions, we could become insolvent or be forced to declare bankruptcy.
 
We may not be able to raise additional capital on favorable terms, if at all, particularly with the current volatile market conditions.
 
We will need additional financing to further our drug development programs as well as future trials. In our capital-raising efforts, we may seek to sell additional equity or debt securities or obtain a bank credit facility. The sale of additional equity or debt securities, if convertible, could result in dilution to our stockholders. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in increased fixed obligations and could also result in covenants that would restrict our operations. However, we may not be able to raise additional funds on acceptable terms, or at all. Given the current global economic climate, we may have more difficulty raising funds than we would during a period of economic stability. If we are unable to secure sufficient capital to fund our research and development activities, we may not be able to continue operations, or we may have to enter into collaboration agreements that could require us to share commercial rights to our products to a greater extent or at earlier stages in the drug development process than is currently intended. These collaborations, if consummated prior to proof-of-efficacy or safety of a given product candidate, could impair our ability to realize value from that product candidate. If our business does not generate the cash needed to finance our ongoing operations and therefore, we will likely need to continue to raise additional capital.
 
7

 

The market price and volume of our common stock fluctuate significantly and could result in substantial losses for individual investors.
 
The stock market from time to time experiences significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These broad market fluctuations may cause the market price and volume of our common stock to decrease. In addition, the market price and volume of our common stock is highly volatile.
 
Factors that may cause the market price and volume of our common stock to decrease include:
 
 
·
adverse results or delays in our clinical trials;
 
 
·
fluctuations in our results of operations, timing and announcements of our bio-technological innovations or new products or those of our competitors;
 
 
·
developments concerning any strategic alliances or acquisitions we may enter into;
 
 
·
announcements of FDA non-approval of our drug products, or delays in the FDA or other foreign regulatory review process or actions;
 
 
·
adverse actions taken by regulatory agencies with respect to our drug products, clinical trials, manufacturing processes or sales and marketing activities;
 
 
·
any lawsuit involving us or our drug products;
 
 
·
developments with respect to our patents and proprietary rights;
 
 
·
announcements of technological innovations or new products by our competitors;
 
 
·
public concern as to the safety of products developed by us or others;
 
 
·
regulatory developments in the United States and in foreign countries;
 
 
·
changes in stock market analyst recommendations regarding our common stock or lack of analyst coverage;
 
 
·
the pharmaceutical industry generally and general market conditions;
 
 
·
failure of our results of operations to meet the expectations of stock market analysts and investors;
 
 
·
sales of our common stock by our executive officers, directors and five percent stockholders or sales of substantial amounts of our common stock.
 
 
·
changes in accounting principles; and
 
 
·
loss of any of our key scientific or management personnel.
 
We face heavy government regulation, and FDA regulatory approval of our products is uncertain.
 
The research, testing, manufacturing and marketing of drug products such as those that we are developing are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state and local government authorities, including the FDA. To obtain regulatory approval of a product, we must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the applicable regulatory agency that, among other things, the product is safe and effective for its intended use. In addition, we must show that the manufacturing facilities used to produce the products are in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices regulations or cGMP.
 
The process of obtaining FDA and other required regulatory approvals and clearances will require us to expend substantial time and capital. Despite the time and expense expended, regulatory approval is never guaranteed. The number of pre-clinical and clinical trials that will be required for FDA approval varies depending on the drug candidate, the disease or condition that the drug candidate is in development for, and the requirements applicable to that particular drug candidate. The FDA can delay, limit or deny approval of a drug candidate for many reasons, including that:
 
 
·
a drug candidate may not be shown to be safe or effective;
 
 
·
the FDA may not approve our manufacturing process;

 
8

 
 
 
·
the FDA may interpret data from pre-clinical and clinical trials in different ways than we do;
 
 
·
the FDA may not meet, or may extend, the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (“PDUFA”) date with respect to a particular New Drug Application (“NDA”);
 
For example, if certain of our methods for analyzing our trial data are not accepted by the FDA, we may fail to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates.
 
Moreover, if and when our products do obtain marketing approval, the marketing, distribution and manufacture of such products would remain subject to extensive ongoing regulatory requirements. Failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements could result in:
 
 
·
warning letters
 
 
·
fines
 
 
·
civil penalties
 
 
·
injunctions
 
 
·
recall or seizure of products
 
 
·
total or partial suspension of production
 
 
·
refusal of the government to grant future approvals
 
 
·
withdrawal of approvals
 
 
·
criminal prosecution
 
Any delay or failure by us to obtain regulatory approvals for our product candidates could diminish competitive advantages that we may attain and would adversely affect the marketing of our products. We have not received regulatory approval to market any of our product candidates in any jurisdiction.
 
If we do not raise additional funds, we will not be able to continue operations or complete the necessary clinical trials to complete development of OHR/AVR118 or our other products and will not be able to sell it anywhere.
 
We will not be able to sell OHR/AVR118 or our other products in the United States unless we submit, and the FDA approves, a new drug application, or NDA for each such product. We must conduct clinical trials of each of our products in humans before we submit an NDA. We do not have sufficient capital currently to complete the necessary trials to complete the development of OHR/AVR118 or any of our other therapeutic drug products.
 
It is possible that the results of clinical trials of OHR/AVR118 or our other products will not prove that they are safe and effective. It is also possible that the FDA will not approve the sale of any of our products in the United States if we submit an NDA for such product. It is not known at this time how later stage clinical trials will be conducted, if at all. Even if the data show that any of our products is safe and effective, obtaining approval of the NDA could take years and require financing of amounts not presently available to us.
 
Conducting the clinical trials of each of our products will require significant cash expenditures and we do not have the funds necessary to complete all phases of clinical trials for OHR/AVR118 or any other products. Our products may never be approved for commercial distribution by any country. Because our research and development expenses and clinical trial expenses will be charged against earnings for financial reporting purposes, we expect that losses from operations will continue to be incurred for the near future. We currently do not have sufficient funds to complete all phases of clinical trials of any of our products which are required to permit the commercial sale of such products.
 
If the results of our clinical trials do not support our claims relating to any drug candidate or if serious side effects are identified, the completion of development of such drug candidate may be significantly delayed or we may be forced to abandon development altogether, which will significantly impair our ability to generate product revenues.
 
The results of our clinical trials with respect to any drug candidate might not support our claims of safety or efficacy, the effects of our drug candidates may not be the desired effects or may include undesirable side effects or the drug candidates may have other unexpected characteristics. Further, success in preclinical testing and early clinical trials does not ensure that later clinical trials will be successful, and the results of later clinical trials may not
 
9

 

replicate the results of prior clinical trials and preclinical testing. The clinical trial process may fail to demonstrate that our drug candidates are safe for humans and effective for indicated uses. In addition, our clinical trials may involve a specific and small patient population. Because of the small sample size, the results of these early clinical trials may not be indicative of future results. Adverse or inconclusive results may cause us to abandon a drug candidate and may delay development of other drug candidates. Any delay in, or termination of, our clinical trials will delay the filing of our NDAs with the FDA and, ultimately, significantly impair our ability to commercialize our drug candidates and generate product revenues which would have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We have found it difficult to enroll patients in our clinical trials, which has caused significant delays in the completion of such trials and which may cause us to abandon one or more clinical trials.
 
For the diseases or disorders that our product candidates are intended to treat, we expect only a subset of the patients with these diseases to be eligible for our clinical trials. Given that each of our product candidates is in the early stages of preclinical or clinical development, we may not be able to initiate or continue clinical trials for each or all of our product candidates if we are unable to locate a sufficient number of eligible subjects to participate in the clinical trials required by the FDA and/or other foreign regulatory authorities. The requirements of our clinical testing mandate that a patient cannot be involved in another clinical trial for the same indication. We are aware that our competitors have ongoing clinical trials for products that are competitive with our product candidates and subjects who would otherwise be eligible for our clinical trials may be involved in such testing, rendering them unavailable for testing of our product candidates. Our inability to enroll a sufficient number of patients for any of our current or future clinical trials would result in significant delays or may require us to abandon one or more clinical trials altogether, which would have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
If our contract research organizations do not successfully carry out their duties or if we lose our relationships with contract research organizations, our drug development efforts could be delayed.
 
We are dependent on contract research organizations, third-party vendors and investigators for pre-clinical testing and clinical trials related to our drug discovery and development efforts and we will likely continue to depend on them to assist in our future discovery and development efforts. These parties are not our employees and we cannot control the amount or timing of resources that they devote to our programs. If they fail to devote sufficient time and resources to our drug development programs or if their performance is substandard, it will delay the development and commercialization of our product candidates. The parties with which we contract for execution of our clinical trials play a significant role in the conduct of the trials and the subsequent collection and analysis of data. Their failure to meet their obligations could adversely affect clinical development of our product candidates.
 
If we lose our relationship with any one or more of these parties, we could experience a significant delay in both identifying another comparable provider and then contracting for its services. We may be unable to retain an alternative provider on reasonable terms, if at all. Even if we locate an alternative provider, it is likely that this provider may need additional time to respond to our needs and may not provide the same type or level of service as the original provider. In addition, any provider that we retain will be subject to current Good Laboratory Practices, and similar foreign standards and we do not have control over compliance with these regulations by these providers. Consequently, if these practices and standards are not adhered to by these providers, the development and commercialization of our product candidates could be delayed.
 
If we are ever in a position to commercialize our product candidates, of which there can be no assurance, we have no experience selling, marketing or distributing products and no internal capability to do so.
 
We currently have no sales, marketing or distribution capabilities and no experience in building a sales force and distribution capabilities. If we are ever in a position to commercialize our product candidates, of which there can be no assurance, we must either develop internal sales, marketing and distribution capabilities, which will be expensive and time consuming, or make arrangements with third parties to perform these services. If we decide to market any of our products directly, we must commit significant financial and managerial resources to develop a marketing and sales force with technical expertise and with supporting distribution capabilities. Building an in-house marketing and sales force with technical expertise and distribution capabilities will require significant expenditures, management resources and time. Factors that may inhibit our efforts to commercialize our products directly and without strategic partners include:
 
 
·
our inability to recruit and retain adequate numbers of effective sales and marketing personnel;

 
10

 
 
 
·
the inability of sales personnel to obtain access to or persuade adequate numbers of physicians to prescribe our products;
 
 
·
the lack of complementary products to be offered by sales personnel, which may put us at a competitive disadvantage relative to companies with more extensive product lines; and
 
 
·
unforeseen costs and expenses associated with creating and sustaining an independent sales and marketing organization.
 
We may not be successful in recruiting the sales and marketing personnel necessary to sell our products and even if we do build a sales force, they may not be successful in marketing our products, which would have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
Developments by competitors may render our products or technologies obsolete or non-competitive which would have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We compete against fully integrated pharmaceutical companies and smaller companies that are collaborating with larger pharmaceutical companies, academic institutions, government agencies and other public and private research organizations. Our drug candidates will have to compete with existing therapies and therapies under development by our competitors. In addition, our commercial opportunities may be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and market products that are less expensive, more effective or safer than our drug products. Other companies have drug candidates in various stages of preclinical or clinical development to treat diseases for which we are also seeking to develop drug products. Some of these potential competing drugs are further advanced in development than our drug candidates and may be commercialized earlier. Even if we are successful in developing effective drugs, our products may not compete successfully with products produced by our competitors.
 
Most of our competitors, either alone or together with their collaborative partners, operate larger research and development programs, staff and facilities and have substantially greater financial resources than we do, as well as significantly greater experience in:
 
 
·
developing drugs;
 
 
·
undertaking preclinical testing and human clinical trials;
 
 
·
obtaining FDA and other regulatory approvals of drugs;
 
 
·
formulating and manufacturing drugs; and
 
 
·
launching, marketing and selling drugs.
 
These organizations also compete with us to attract qualified personnel, acquisitions and joint ventures candidates and for other collaborations. Activities of our competitors may impose unanticipated costs on our business which would have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We rely on confidentiality agreements that could be breached and may be difficult to enforce which could have a material adverse effect on our business and competitive position.
 
Our policy is to enter agreements relating to the non-disclosure of confidential information with third parties, including our contractors, consultants, advisors and research collaborators, as well as agreements that purport to require the disclosure and assignment to us of the rights to the ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions of our employees and consultants while we employ them. However, these agreements can be difficult and costly to enforce. Moreover, to the extent that our contractors, consultants, advisors and research collaborators apply or independently develop intellectual property in connection with any of our projects, disputes may arise as to the proprietary rights to this type of information. If a dispute arises, a court may determine that the right belongs to a third party, and enforcement of our rights can be costly and unpredictable. In addition, we rely on trade secrets and proprietary know-how that we will seek to protect in part by confidentiality agreements with our employees, contractors, consultants, advisors or others. Despite the protective measures we employ, we still face the risk that:
 
 
·
these agreements may be breached;
 
 
·
these agreements may not provide adequate remedies for the applicable type of breach; or
 
 
·
our trade secrets or proprietary know-how will otherwise become known.

 
11

 
 
 Any breach of our confidentiality agreements or our failure to effectively enforce such agreements would have a material adverse effect on our business and competitive position.
 
If we infringe the rights of third parties we could be prevented from selling products, forced to pay damages and required to defend against litigation which could result in substantial costs and may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We have not received to date any claims of infringement by any third parties. However, as our product candidates progress into clinical trials and commercialization, if at all, our public profile and that of our product candidates may be raised and generate such claims. Defending against such claims, and occurrence of a judgment adverse to us, could result in unanticipated costs and may have a material adverse effect on our business and competitive position. If our products, methods, processes and other technologies infringe the proprietary rights of other parties, we could incur substantial costs and we may have to:
 
 
·
obtain licenses, which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all;
 
 
·
redesign our products or processes to avoid infringement;
 
 
·
stop using the subject matter claimed in the patents held by others, which could cause us to lose the use of one or more of our drug candidates;
 
 
·
defend litigation or administrative proceedings that may be costly whether we win or lose, and which could result in a substantial diversion of management resources; or
 
 
·
pay damages.
 
Any costs incurred in connection with such events or the inability to sell our products may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We depend upon key officers and consultants in a competitive market for skilled personnel. If we are unable to attract and retain key personnel, it could adversely affect our ability to develop and market our products.
 
We are highly dependent upon the principal members of our management team, especially our Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Irach Taraporewala, our Chief Scientific Advisor, Dr. S. Z. Hirschman, and Sam Backenroth, our Vice President of business development and interim CFO, as well as our directors, including Ira Greenstein, the Chairman of our Board of Directors. A loss of any of these personnel may have a material adverse effect on aspects of our business and clinical development and regulatory programs. We have employment agreements with Dr. Taraporewala and Mr. Backenroth, and a consulting agreement with Dr. Hirschman. Although these agreements include a non-competition covenant, the applicable noncompetition provisions can be difficult and costly to monitor and enforce. The loss of any of these persons’ services would adversely affect our ability to develop and market our products and obtain necessary regulatory approvals. Further, we do not maintain key-man life insurance.
 
We also depend in part on obtaining the service of scientific personnel and our ability to identify, hire and retain additional personnel. We experience intense competition for qualified personnel, and the existence of non-competition agreements between prospective employees and their former employers may prevent us from hiring those individuals or subject us to suit from their former employers. While we attempt to provide competitive compensation packages to attract and retain key personnel, many of our competitors are likely to have greater resources and more experience than we have, making it difficult for us to compete successfully for key personnel.
 
Intellectual property litigation is increasingly common and increasingly expensive and may result in restrictions on our business and substantial costs, even if we prevail.
 
Patent and other intellectual property litigation is becoming more common in the pharmaceutical industry. Litigation is sometimes necessary to defend against or assert claims of infringement, to enforce our patent rights, including those we have licensed from others, to protect trade secrets or to determine the scope and validity of proprietary rights of third parties. Currently, no third party is asserting that we are infringing upon their patent rights or other intellectual property, nor are we aware or believe that we are infringing upon any third party’s patent rights or other intellectual property. We may, however, be infringing upon a third party’s patent rights or other intellectual property, and litigation asserting such claims might be initiated in which we would not prevail, or we would not be able to obtain the necessary licenses on reasonable terms, if at all. All such litigation, whether meritorious or not, as well as litigation initiated by us against third parties, is time-consuming and very expensive to defend or prosecute and to resolve. In addition, if we infringe the intellectual property rights of others, we could lose our right to develop, manufacture or sell our products or could be required to pay monetary damages or royalties to license proprietary rights from third parties. An adverse determination in a judicial or administrative proceeding or a failure to obtain necessary licenses could prevent us from manufacturing or selling our products, which could harm our business, financial condition and prospects.

 
12

 
 
If our competitors prepare and file patent applications in the United States that claim technology we also claim, we may have to participate in interference proceedings required by the USPTO to determine priority of invention, which could result in substantial costs, even if we ultimately prevail. Results of interference proceedings are highly unpredictable and may result in us having to try to obtain licenses in order to continue to develop or market certain of our drug products.
 
Any future acquisitions we make of companies or technologies may result in disruption to our business or distraction of our management, due to difficulties in assimilating acquired personnel and operations.
 
We may acquire or make investments in complementary businesses, technologies, services or products which complement our biotech operations if appropriate opportunities arise. From time to time we engage in discussions and negotiations with companies regarding our acquiring or investing in such companies’ businesses, products, services or technologies, in the ordinary course of our business. We cannot be assured that we will be able to identify future suitable acquisition or investment candidates, or if we do identify suitable candidates, that we will be able to make such acquisitions or investments on commercially acceptable terms or at all. If we acquire or invest in another company, we could have difficulty in assimilating that company’s personnel, operations, technology and software. In addition, the key personnel of the acquired company may decide not to work for us. If we make other types of acquisitions, we could have difficulty in integrating the acquired products, services or technologies into our operations. These difficulties could disrupt our ongoing business, distract our management and employees, increase our expenses and adversely affect our results of operations. Furthermore, we may incur indebtedness or issue equity securities to pay for any future acquisitions. The issuance of equity securities would be dilutive to our existing stockholders. As of January 13, 2011, we had no agreement to enter into any material investment or acquisition transaction.
 
The market for our common stock is highly illiquid. Our stockholders may not be able to resell their shares at or above the purchase price paid by such stockholders, or at all.
 
Our common stock is quoted on NASD’s Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board (or the OTC Bulletin Board). Securities quoted for trading on the OTC Bulletin Board are generally highly illiquid. There is a greater chance of market volatility for securities that trade on the OTC Bulletin Board as opposed to a national exchange or quotation system. This volatility may be caused by a variety of factors including:
 
 
·
the absence of consistent administrative supervision of “bid” and “ask” quotations;
 
 
·
lower trading volume; and
 
 
·
market conditions.
 
There is only sporadic trading in our common stock and our security holders may experience wide fluctuations in the market price of our securities. Such price and volume fluctuations have particularly affected the trading prices of equity securities of many biotechnology companies. These price and volume fluctuations often have been unrelated to the operating performance of the affected companies. These fluctuations may have an extremely negative effect on the market price of our securities and may prevent a stockholder from obtaining a market price equal to the purchase price such stockholder paid when the stockholder attempts to sell our securities in the open market. In these situations, the stockholder may be required either to sell our securities at a market price which is lower than the purchase price the stockholder paid, or to hold our securities for a longer period of time than planned. An inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital by selling shares of capital stock or to recruit and retain managers with equity-based incentive plans.
 
Our common stock is deemed to be “penny stock,” which may make it more difficult for investors to sell their shares due to suitability requirements.
 
Our common stock is deemed to be “penny stock” as that term is defined in Rule 3a51-1 promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). These requirements may reduce the potential market for our common stock by reducing the number of potential investors. This may make it more difficult for investors in our common stock to sell shares to third parties or to otherwise dispose of them. This could cause our stock price to decline.
 
13

 
 
Broker/dealers dealing in penny stocks are required to provide potential investors with a document disclosing the risks of penny stocks. Moreover, broker/dealers are required to determine whether an investment in a penny stock is a suitable investment for a prospective investor.
 
The exercise of our outstanding convertible securities or issuance of additional shares could have dilutive impact on our stockholders, and a significant negative impact on the market price of our common stock.
 
The sale or availability for sale of this number of shares of common stock in the public market could depress the market price of the common stock. Additionally, the sale or availability for sale of this number of shares may lessen the likelihood that additional equity financing will be available to us, on favorable or unfavorable terms.
 
Furthermore, the sale or availability for sale of this number of shares could limit the annual amount of net operating loss carryforwards that could be utilized.
 
We will not pay cash dividends and investors may have to sell their shares in order to realize their investment.
 
We have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not intend to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We intend to use our cash for reinvestment in the development and marketing of our products and services. As a result, investors may have to sell their shares of common stock to realize their investment.
 
Failure to maintain effective internal controls in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results. In addition, current and potential shareholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.
 
Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our results of operation could be harmed.
 
Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. We continuously monitor our existing internal controls over financial reporting systems to confirm that they are compliant with Section 404, and we may identify deficiencies that we may not be able to remediate in time to meet the deadlines imposed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This process may divert internal resources and will take a significant amount of time and effort to complete.
 
If, at any time, it is determined that we are not in compliance with Section 404, we may be required to implement new internal control procedures and reevaluate our financial reporting. We may experience higher than anticipated operating expenses as well as increased independent auditor fees during the implementation of these changes and thereafter. Further, we may need to hire additional qualified personnel. If we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Failure to maintain an effective internal control environment could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.
 
Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure may result in additional expenses, divert management’s attention from operating our business which could have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
There have been other changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure in addition to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as new regulations promulgated by the Commission and rules promulgated by the national securities exchanges. These new or changed laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies, which could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. As a result, our efforts to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards are likely to continue to result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management
 
 
14

 

time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. Our board members, Chief Executive Officer, and Chief Financial Officer could face an increased risk of personal liability in connection with the performance of their duties. As a result, we may have difficulty attracting and retaining qualified board members and executive officers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. If our efforts to comply with new or changed laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies, we may incur additional expenses to comply with standards set by regulatory authorities or governing bodies which would have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
ITEM 2
PROPERTIES
 
We do not currently lease or own any facilities for office space. Our offices are provided to us free of charge from an affiliate of Mr. Backenroth.
 
ITEM 3
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
Neither OHR nor its property is a party to any pending legal proceedings.
 
ITEM 4
REMOVED AND RESERVED

 
15

 
 
 Part II
 
ITEM 5
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASE OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
OHR’s shares of common stock are quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board (OTCBB). Its trading symbol is OHRP. Following is a table of the quotation ranges (high and low trading prices) for its shares for OHR’s last two years.
 
   
High
 
Low
     
High
 
Low
     
High
 
Low
FY 2011
         
FY 2010
         
FY 2009
       
October 1st
December 31st 2010
 
$0.30
 
$0.17
 
October 1st
December 31st 2009
 
$1.25
 
$0.25
 
October 1st
December 31st 2008
 
$0.80
 
$0.25
January 1st – January 13th, 2011
 
$0.30
 
$0.25
 
January 1st – March 31st 2010
 
$0.80
 
$0.32
 
January 1st
March 31st 2009
 
$0.80
 
$0.25
           
April 1st
June 30th 2010
 
$0.80
 
$0.40
 
April 1st
June 30th 2009
 
$0.20
 
$0.20
           
July 1st
September 30th 2010
 
$0.48
 
$0.15
 
July 1st
September 30th 2009
 
$0.49
 
$0.14
 
———————
 
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds from Registered Securities
 
On June 3, 2009, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the Company sold 5,583,336 series B preferred shares with 5,583,336 Series G Warrants and 5,583,336 Series F Warrants attached. Each share of preferred stock has the same voting rights of common shareholders and has a conversion feature where series B preferred shares can be converted into common shares at the conversion rate of 1 to 1. Warrants included in each unit sold have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.18.
 
Between October 29 and December 4, 2009, the Company issued a total of 236,000 warrants for services rendered to the Company.  In conjunction with this issuance, the Company recognized $88,562 in consulting expense.
 
On December 15, 2009, investors exercised 5,583,336 Series G warrants via a cashless exchange for 4,547,238 shares of the Company’s common stock.
 
On January 15, 2010, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the company issued 5,583,336 common shares to holders of the series F Warrants who exercised their warrants at an exercise price of $0.18. Additionally, as an inducement to the holders to exercise the Warrants, the Company issued 5,583,336 Series H warrants to the Series F warrant holders who exercised their Series F warrants.. The Series H Warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.55.
 
On April 9, 2010 the Company granted 10,000 warrants as payment for an outstanding accounts payable balance of $3,991.
 
On April 12, 2010 the Company hired Dr. Irach Taraporewala as CEO and Sam Backenroth as Vice President of Business Development and Interim CFO, and Andrew Limpert resigned as an officer of the Company.  Pursuant to the employee stock option plan plan adopted September 2009, Dr. Taraporewala received 800,000 options exercisable at $0.50 vesting over 4 years and Mr. Backenroth received 200,000 options exercisable at $0.50 vesting over 4 years. Further details about Dr. Taraporewala and Mr. Backenroth’s employment can be found in the Company’s Form 8-K filed with the SEC on April 12, 2010.
 
On June 22, 2010 the Company authorized the issuance of 93,000 warrants to be issued for services to be provided to the Company.  Of these authorized warrants, 90,000 were issued on June 23, 2010 once the contract for services was finalized. These warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.50. The remaining 3,000 warrants were issued September 2, 2010. These warrants have a 3 year term with a strike price of $0.50.  The combined value of these options is $41,129 and was expensed as research and development expense.

 
16

 
 
On August 5, 2010 the Company issued 50,000 shares of its common stock to a consultant for services to be provided to the Company.
 
On November 5, 2010 the Company issued 50,000 shares of its common stock to a consultant for services to be provided to the Company.
 
On December 30, 2010 the Company sold 4,200,000 shares of common stock to a group of institutional and accredited investors for gross proceeds of $1,050,000. In addition, the investors received 2,520,000 five year warrants to purchase common stock at an exercise price of $0.55 per share.
 
Stock Repurchase
 
OHR has not engaged in any stock repurchase transactions and no stock repurchase plan is currently in place.
 
ITEM 6
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
Not required for a smaller reporting company.
 
ITEM 7
MANAGEMENTS’ DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Safe Harbor Statement
 
Certain statements contained in this report, including, without limitation, statements containing the words “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” and words of similar import, constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 or by the Securities and Exchange Commission in its rules, regulations and releases, regarding the Company’s financial and business prospects. These forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements, which are being made pursuant to the provisions of such Act and with the intention of obtaining the benefits of the “safe harbor” provisions of such Act. The Company cautions investors that any forward-looking statements it makes are not guarantees of future performance and that actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. We assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this report, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Any investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. For a general discussion of some of these risks in greater detail, see our “Risk Factors” on page 6 of this Annual Report.
 
General
 
The Company is a biotechnology rollup company currently focused on development of the Company’s previously acquired compounds. With the addition of our executive management team in April 2010, we have shifted our strategy accordingly to focus on the development of our two later stage lead products, OHR/AVR 118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia, and Evizon® (Squalamine) for the treatment of wet-AMD. We acquired OHR/AVR118 in a secured party sale and Evizon®(Squalamine) from the Genaera Liquidating Trust as part of the Company’s previous strategy to create a rollup of undervalued biotechnology companies and assets.
 
We seek to advance our two lead products through later stage clinical trials as well as developing some of our earlier stage products and indications that we are moving forward with minimal capital outlay. We have also started a new initiative to seek and implement strategic alternatives with respect to our products, including licenses, business collaborations and other business combinations or transactions with other pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.  From time to time, we may engage in discussions with third parties regarding the licensure, sale or acquisition of our products and technologies or a merger or sale of the Company; however we currently do not have plans to enter into such a transaction and there is no assurance that the Company will complete such a transaction.
 
The Company has limited core operating expenses as we have only two full-time employees.  In connection with the hiring of our executive management team, we have established an office in New York City. The office is being provided by an affiliate of Mr. Backenroth free of charge with the exception of minimal office related expenses. 

 
17

 
 
The Company will continue to incur ongoing operating losses, which are expected to increase substantially as it funds development of the new pharmaceutical compounds. In addition, losses will be incurred in paying ongoing reporting expenses, including legal and accounting expenses, as necessary to maintain the Company as a public entity.  No projected date for potential revenues can be made, and the Company is undercapitalized at present to completely develop, test and market any pharmaceutical product.
 
Until the Company is able to generate significant revenue from its principal operations, it will remain classified as a development stage company. The Company can give no assurance that it will be successful in such efforts or that its limited operating funds will be adequate to support the Company’s operations, nor can there be any assurance of any additional funding being available to the Company. Our independent accountants have qualified their audit report by expressing doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a “going concern.”
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
The Company has extremely limited working capital reserves with which to continue development of its pharmaceutical products and continuing operations. The Company is reliant, at present, upon its capital reserves for ongoing operations and has no revenues.
 
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2010, the Company had zero revenues and operating expenses of approximately $1,015,591.  The loss from operations was comprised of $254,021 in research and development costs with the remaining $761,570 being other general and administrative expenses.  During the same period, the Company recorded interest expense of $21,493, other income of $50,875, and a gain on derivative liabilities of $1,480,586. The net income from continuing operations for the year ended September 30, 2010 was $494,377.
 
For the year ended September 30, 2009 the Company realized no revenue, had operating expenses of $932,883, resulting in a loss from operations of $932,833.  The Company recognized interest expense of $25,797 and other income of $94,231 resulting in a net loss of $864,449 during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009.
 
Net working capital reserves increased from the beginning of the 2010 fiscal year to the end by $107,951 from $92,673 to $200,624 primarily due to capital raised through the sale of convertible debentures decreased by the repayment of a substantial portion of the Company’s convertible debentures. At present, the Company has no bank line of credit or other fixed source of capital reserves. Should it need additional capitalization in the future, it will be primarily reliant upon private or public placement of its equities for which there can be no warranty or assurance that the Company may be successful in such efforts. The Company raised $1,050,000 through the private placement of its common stock and warrants in December 2010, and management believes the Company has sufficient capital to meet its planned operating needs through December 2011.
 
Results of Operations
 
As noted above, the Company had no revenues for fiscal year 2010, and does not reasonably anticipate that it will have revenues in fiscal year 2011. The operating expenses of the Company increased from fiscal year 2009 to 2010 by approximately $82,708.  A significant decrease in general and administrative expenses was offset by an increase in research and development costs incurred as ongoing development costs and testing efforts for its pharmaceutical products. The Company also saw a decrease in interest expense of $4,304 from 2009 due to payments of convertible debentures issued by the Company during 2009. The Company anticipates it will have higher expenditures in fiscal year 2011, including a full year of employee expenses, again without offsetting revenues.
 
Results of continuing operations for the year ended September 30, 2010 reflect the following changes from the prior period:
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
Change
 
Revenues
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
Cost of Revenues
    -       -       -  
Selling, General & Administrative Expenses
    761,570       908,353       (146,783 )
Research and Development
    254,021       24,530       229,491  
Loss from Operations
    (1,015,591 )     (932,883 )     82,708  
Other income and (expense)
    1,509,968       68,434       1,441,534  
Income (loss) from discontinued Operations
    -       -       -  
Net Income (loss)
  $ 494,377     $ (864,449 )   $ 1,358,826  

 
18

 
 
Until the Company experiences an increase in operations as it continues to implement its business plan, significant losses are expected to continue as the trend is reflected in the chart above.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
The Company has not entered into any off-balance sheet arrangements of which it is aware.
 
Tabular Description of Principal Contracts
 
The Company is not engaged in any contract for sale or distribution of its product to date; and, therefore, does not have any specific disclosure under this heading.
 
Summary of Significant Events
 
On March 20, 2009, the Company acquired in a secured party sale all the patents, related intellectual property, clinical data and other assets related to AVR 118 (renamed OHR/AVR118). OHR/AVR118 is in an ongoing Phase II trial for the treatment of cachexia. The Company also exercised its option to acquire the new technology and early stage pharmaceutical compounds from Dr. S. Z. Hirschman, who joined the Company as a consultant and Chief Scientific Advisor.
 
The Company acquired the assets in the secured party sale with $100,000 in cash and by issuing a $500,000 principal amount 11% convertible secured non-recourse debenture due June 20, 2011, and convertible at $0.40 per share (the “Convertible Debenture”). The Convertible Debenture is secured by the acquired assets. As of September 30, 2010 the balance of the convertible note is $51,115. The cash portion of the purchase price was financed by short-term loans from an affiliate of Orin Hirschman, a director of the Company, and another current shareholder. The Convertible Debenture was paid in full on December 29, 2010.
 
 On June 3, 2009, the Company completed a financing in which the Company sold 5,583,336 series B preferred shares with 5,583,336 Series G Warrants and 5,583,336 Series F Warrants attached. Each share of preferred stock has the same voting rights of common shareholders and has a conversion feature where series B preferred shares can be converted into common shares at the conversion rate of 1 to 1. Warrants included in each unit sold have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.18. The Company received $1,005,000 in cash in exchange for the units sold.
 
On August 5, 2009 the Company completed a short-form merger whereby BBM Holdings, Inc. (“BBM”) merged with its wholly-owned Delaware subsidiary to be known as Ohr Pharmaceutical, Inc. (“OHR”), a Delaware public entity. The purposes of the merger were as follows: To change the name and business purposes of the Company to a pharmaceutical company to accommodate the acquisition of the pharmaceutical products, concepts and patents from Dr. Hirschman and other parties as described above and to change the domicile of the Company to Delaware.
 
As a result of the merger, the Company is now known as Ohr Pharmaceutical, Inc.. It should be noted the merger was approved by majority shareholder consent and did not involve the issuance of any new shares. The merger did include an increase in authorized shares of common stock to 180,000,000 shares and preferred stock to 15,000,000 and assigned a par value of $0.0001 for each class of stock. OHR applied for a new trading symbol to reflect the name change and is now trading on a limited basis under the symbol OHRP.ob.
 
On August 19,, 2009 the Company completed the acquisition of Squalamine, Trodusquemine and related compounds from Geneara Liquidating Trust. The Company paid $200,000 in cash for the compounds.
 
On December 15, 2009, investors exercised 5,583,336 Series G warrants via a cashless exchange for 4,547,238 shares of the Company’s common stock.
 
On January 15, 2010, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the company issued 5,583,336 common shares to holders of the series F Warrants who exercised their warrants at an exercise price of $0.18. Additionally, as an inducement to the holders to exercise the Warrants, the Company issued 5,583,336 Series H warrants to the Series F warrant holders who exercised their Series F warrants.. The Series H Warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.55.
 
19

 
 
On April 12, 2010 the Company hired Dr. Irach Taraporewala as CEO and Sam Backenroth as Vice President of Business Development and Interim CFO, and Andrew Limpert resigned as an officer of the Company.  Pursuant to the employee stock option plan plan adopted September 2009, Dr. Taraporewala received 800,000 options exercisable at $0.50 vesting over 4 years and Mr. Backenroth received 200,000 options exercisable at $0.50 vesting over 4 years. Further details about Dr. Taraporewala and Mr. Backenroth’s employment can be found in the Company’s Form 8-K filed with the SEC on April 12, 2010.
 
Discontinued Operations and Divestment of Assets
 
On June 5, 2007, BBM Holdings announced that it ceased operations and reduced employment to a small residual force. The Company received notification of the cancellation of two customer contracts on May 22, 2007 and May 28, 2007, respectively. In addition, the Company’s largest customer announced that it would suspend further installations of systems on its vessels for a four-month period.  The Company also received notification of the cancellation of a third customer contract on June 1, 2007.
 
The Company obtained a release of long-term obligations with substantially all of its predecessor’s  vendors.
 
On October 16, 2007, BBM agreed to sell substantially all of its assets (primarily intellectual property and technology) relating to broadband services to ships to private investors for $460,000 pursuant to an asset purchase agreement (the “Asset Purchase Agreement”). The Company completed the transaction on November 1, 2007, after required stockholder approval under Utah corporate law. In conjunction with the completion of the asset sale, BBM’s major customer has agreed to release the Company of its obligation to pay accrued commissions of $45,000 as well as agreeing to withdraw its claim of $420,000.
 
The Company has limited core operating expenses as we have only two full-time employees.  In connection with the hiring of our executive management team, we have established an office in New York City. The office is being provided by an affiliate of Mr. Backenroth free of charge with the exception of minimal office related expenses. 
 
Products and Markets
 
The Company is a pharmaceutical rollup company currently focused on development of the Company’s previously acquired compounds. With the addition of our executive management team in April 2010, we have shifted our strategy accordingly to focus on the development of our two later stage lead products, OHR/AVR 118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia, and Evizon® (Squalamine) for the treatment of wet-AMD. We acquired OHR/AVR118 in a secured party sale and Evizon®(Squalamine) from the Genaera Liquidating Trust as part of the Company’s previous strategy to create a rollup of undervalued biotechnology companies and assets
 
OHR/AVR118
 
OHR/AVR118 is a novel immunomodulator with a singular chemical structure that is terminally sterilized and endotoxin-free.  The compound is composed of two small peptides, Peptide A, that is 31 amino acids long, and Peptide B, which is 21 amino acids long. Peptide B is unique in that the dinucleotide, diadenosine, is covalently attached to serine at position 18 through a phosphodiester bond. OHR/AVR118 is quite stable and has a very favorable safety profile both in animal toxicity studies and in human clinical trials.
 
Ohr is currently conducting a Phase II clinical trial of OHR/AVR 118 for the treatment of cancer cachexia at a leading cancer center in Canada. Cancer cachexia is a severe wasting disorder characterized by weight loss, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness, and significant loss of appetite. This disorder is often seen in late stage cancer patients. OHR/AVR118 has also shown to have chemoprotective effects, thus potentially allowing patients to better tolerate chemotherapy and radiation as well as more intensive treatment regimens with ordinary toxic chemotherapeutic agents, while maintaining body weight and avoiding other side effects. There is currently no widely accepted long-term effective drug for the treatment of cancer cachexia. The company presented interim data on this current trial at the annual conference of the Society of Cachexia and Wasting Disorders in Barcelona, Spain in December 2009.  

 
20

 

Squalamine
 
Squalamine is a systemic intracellular, anti-angiogenic drug with a novel mechanism of action. Its ophthalmic formulation, Evizon®, has been evaluated against the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, which affects over 200,000 new patients a year in the US alone.
 
In Phase II trials, in which no drug-related ocular or systemic effects were observed, stabilization or improvement in visual activity was observed in the vast majority of patients, with both early and advanced lesions responding. In a significant number of patients that had a more advanced wet AMD-affected eye (“fellow eye”), who were not candidates for therapy with the currently approved wet-AMD drug therapy, the administration of Squalamine produced beneficial effects in this non-treatable AMD-affected fellow eye as well.  As opposed to the current approved standard of therapy, Evizon® does not require direct injection into the eye.  In addition, Evizon®’s novel mechanism of action avoids the systemic and ophthalmic side effects associated with intraocular injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies.
 
Additionally, because of its potent anti-angiogenic effects and secondary mechanisms of action, Squalamine also shows promise in the treatment of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer. In a concluded Phase IIa study, patients with stage III and IV refractory and resistant ovarian cancer received Squalamine in conjunction with another chemotherapeutic agent with approximately two thirds of the patients achieving a complete response, partial response or stable disease. In 2001, Squalamine was awarded Orphan Drug Status by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) for the treatment of late stage refractory and resistant ovarian cancer. Because of funding constraints, Ohr is seeking a development partner to further advance development of this indication.
 
The Company will continue to incur ongoing operating losses, which are expected to increase substantially after it funds development of the new pharmaceutical compounds. In addition, losses will be incurred in paying ongoing reporting expenses, including legal and accounting expenses, as necessary to maintain the Company as a public entity, as well as costs while searching for additional merger and acquisition candidates. No projected date for potential revenues can be made and the Company is undercapitalized at present to develop, test and market any pharmaceutical product.
 
ITEM 7A        QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Market risk represents the risk of loss arising from adverse changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates. Due to its limited operations, the Company does not have any material exposure to interest rate or exchange rate risk.
 
ITEM 8           FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
Following are the financial statements prepared by OHR and audited by its independent auditors. These financial statements constitute the formal presentation of financial information by the Company, such that all other financial information contained in this 10-K report should be read and reviewed in light of the following financial statements and notes thereto. Should there exist any conflict between information appearing elsewhere in this Report and the following financial statements, the financial statements should be given primary definition and control. The notes attached to the financial statements constitute an integral part of the financial disclosure and should be read and reviewed in connection with the financial statements.
 
 
21

 
 
 
   
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To The Board of Directors and Stockholders of
OHR Pharmaceutical, Inc.
 
 
We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of OHR Pharmaceutical, Inc. (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2010 and 2009, and the related statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the years then ended, and for the period of October 1, 2007 (inception) through September 30, 2010.  These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States of America).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of OHR Pharmaceutical, Inc. as of September 30, 2010 and 2009, and the results of its operations, and its cash flows for the years then ended and for the period of October 1, 2007 (inception) through September 30, 2010, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
 
The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has incurred losses from operations, has a liquidity problem, and requires additional funds for its operational activities. These factors raise substantial doubt that the Company will be able to continue as a going concern.  The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
 
 
/s/ Child, Van Wagoner & Bradshaw, PLLC
Certified Public Accountants
Salt Lake City, Utah
January 12, 2011
 
 
22

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Balance Sheets

ASSETS
 
             
 
September 30,
 
September 30,
 
 
2010
 
2009
 
CURRENT ASSETS
         
Cash
  $ 422,414     $ 345,604  
Prepaid expenses
    34,889       -  
Grant receivable
    65,122       -  
Security deposits
    85,025       85,025  
Total Current Assets
    607,450       430,629  
                 
EQUIPMENT, net
    24,168       -  
                 
OTHER ASSETS
               
Patent costs
    780,407       800,000  
                 
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 1,412,025     $ 1,230,629  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
 
                 
CURRENT LIABILITIES
               
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
  $ 332,772     $ 157,956  
Accrued salaries
    5,453       -  
Short-term notes payable
    17,486       -  
Convertible debentures
    51,115       180,000  
Total Current Liabilities
    406,826       337,956  
                 
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES
               
Convertible debenture-long term
    -       279,988  
Stock warrant derivative liability
    1,387,656       -  
Total Long-term Liabilities
    1,387,656       279,988  
                 
TOTAL LIABILITIES
    1,794,482       617,944  
                 
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
               
                 
Preferred stock, Series B; 15,000,000 shares authorized,
at $0.0001 par value, 5,583,336  and 5,583,336 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
    558       558  
Common stock; 180,000,000 shares authorized,
at $0.0001 par value, 35,452,580 and 25,247,006 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
    3,545       2,525  
Additional paid-in capital
    21,587,433       23,077,972  
Accumulated deficit
    (21,628,748 )     (21,628,748 )
Deficit accumulated during the development stage
    (345,245 )     (839,622 )
                 
Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)
    (382,457 )     612,685  
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND
               
  STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)
  $ 1,412,025     $ 1,230,629  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
 
23

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Operations

               
From Inception of
 
               
the Development
 
               
Stage on
 
               
October 1,
 
   
For the Year Ended
   
2007 Through
 
   
September 30,
   
September 30,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2010
 
                   
REVENUES
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
COST OF SALES
    -       -       -  
GROSS PROFIT
    -       -       -  
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES
                       
General and administrative
    761,570       908,353       2,336,565  
Research and Development
    254,021       24,530       278,551  
Total Operating Expenses
    1,015,591       932,883       2,615,116  
                         
OPERATING LOSS
    (1,015,591 )     (932,883 )     (2,615,116 )
                         
OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSE
                       
Interest expense
    (21,493 )     (25,797 )     (47,290 )
Gain (loss) on foreign currency
    678       2,596       3,274  
Other income and expense
    50,197       91,635       154,888  
Gain on derivative liability
    1,480,586       -       1,480,586  
Total Other Income and Expense
    1,509,968       68,434       1,591,458  
                         
INCOME (LOSS) FROM CONTINUING
                       
OPERATIONS BEFORE INCOME TAXES
    494,377       (864,449 )     (1,023,658 )
                         
PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES
    -       -       -  
                         
INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE
                       
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS
    494,377       (864,449 )     (1,023,658 )
Income from discontinued operations (including gain on disposal of $606)
    -       -       678,413  
GAIN ON DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS
    -       -       678,413  
                         
NET INCOME (LOSS)
  $ 494,377     $ (864,449 )   $ (345,245 )
                         
BASIC LOSS PER SHARE
                       
Continuing operations
  $ 0.02     $ (0.03 )        
Discontinued operations
    0.00       0.00          
    $ 0.02     $ (0.03 )        
WEIGHTED AVERAGE  NUMBER
                       
  OF SHARES OUTSTANDING:
                       
BASIC AND DILUTED
    32,821,879       25,247,006          
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
 
24

 
 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)
 
 
                                   
Deficit
       
                                   
Accumulated
   
Total
 
   
Series B
                 
Additional
   
 
   
During the
   
Stockholders'
 
   
Preferred Stock
   
Common Stock
   
Paid-in
   
Accumulated
   
Development
   
Equity
 
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Capital
   
Deficit
   
Stage
   
(Deficit)
 
Balance, September 30, 2006
 
-
   
$
-
   
1,636,349
   
$
164
   
$
14,641,468
   
$
(15,325,185
 
$
-
   
$
(683,553
                                                             
Preferred stock issued for cash net of expenses
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
6,251,000
 
Preferred stock issued for debt
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
457,000
 
Stock based compensation
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
4,000
     
-
     
-
     
4,000
 
Exercise of stock options
 
-
     
-
   
4,834
     
1
     
1,999
     
-
     
-
     
2,000
 
Conversion of preferred stock to common stock
 
-
     
-
   
22,134,301
     
2,213
     
6,705,787
     
-
     
-
     
-
 
Common stock issued for subsidiary
 
-
     
-
   
1,454,090
     
145
     
(145
   
-
     
-
     
-
 
Common stock issued for cash
 
-
     
-
   
17,432
     
2
     
9,998
     
-
     
-
     
10,000
 
                                                             
Net loss for the year ended September 30, 2007
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
(6,303,563
   
-
     
(6,303,563
                                                             
Balance, October 1, 2007
 
-
     
-
   
25,247,006
     
2,525
     
21,363,107
     
(21,628,748
   
-
     
(263,116
                                                             
Fair value of warrants granted to employees
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
271,484
     
-
     
-
     
271,484
 
Net income for the year ended September 30, 2008
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
24,827
     
24,827
 
                                                             
Balance, September 30, 2008
 
-
     
-
   
25,247,006
     
2,525
     
21,634,591
     
(21,628,748
   
24,827
     
33,195
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
25

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)
 
                           
Deficit
       
                           
Accumulated
   
Total
 
   
Series B
         
Additional
   
 
   
During the
   
Stockholders'
 
   
Preferred Stock
   
Common Stock
   
Paid-in
   
Accumulated
   
Development
   
Equity
 
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Capital
   
Deficit
   
Stage
   
(Deficit)
 
Balance, September 30, 2008
 
-
     
-
   
25,247,006
     
2,525
     
21,634,591
     
(21,628,748
)    
24,827
     
33,195
 
                                                             
Fair value of warrants granted to employees
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
411,860
     
-
     
-
     
411,860
 
Preferred stock issued and warrants issued for cash
 
5,583,336
     
558
   
-
     
-
     
1,004,442
     
-
     
-
     
1,005,000
 
 
                                                           
Fair value of warrants granted
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
27,079
     
-
     
-
     
27,079
 
                                                             
Net loss for the year ended September 30, 2009
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
(864,449
   
(864,449
Balance, September 30, 2009
 
5,583,336
     
558
   
25,247,006
     
2,525
     
23,077,972
     
(21,628,748
)    
(839,622
   
612,685
 
                                                             
Fair value of warrants granted for services and accounts payable
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
133,682
     
-
     
-
     
133,682
 
Fair value of employee stock options
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
219,541
     
-
     
-
     
219,541
 
Exercise of warrants for cash at $0.18 per share
 
-
     
-
   
5,583,336
     
558
     
1,004,442
     
-
     
-
     
1,005,000
 
Issuance of repacement warrants
               
-
     
-
     
(2,868,242
)    
-
     
-
     
(2,868,242
Exercise of cashless warrants
 
-
     
-
   
4,547,238
     
455
     
(455
)    
-
     
-
     
-
 
Conversion of convertible debenture at $0.40 per share
 
-
     
-
   
25,000
     
2
     
9,998
     
-
     
-
     
10,000
 
Common stock issued for services at $0.21 per share
 
-
     
-
   
50,000
     
5
     
10,495
     
-
     
-
     
10,500
 
                                                             
Net income for the year ended September 30, 2010
 
-
     
-
   
-
     
-
     
-
     
-
     
494,377
     
494,377
 
Balance, September 30, 2010
 
5,583,336
   
$
558
   
35,452,580
   
$
3,545
   
$
21,587,433
   
$
(21,628,748
 
$
(345,245
 
$
(382,457
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
 
26

 
 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Cash Flow
 
 
               
From Inception
 
               
of the
 
               
Development
 
               
Stage on
 
               
October 1,
 
   
For the Year Ended
   
2007 Through
 
   
September 30,
   
September 30,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2010
 
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
                 
Net income (loss)
  $ 494,377     $ (864,449 )   $ (345,245 )
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash
                       
  used by operating activities:
                       
Discontinued operations
    -       -       (678,413 )
Common stock issued for services
    10,500       -       10,500  
Fair value of warrants issued for services
    129,691       27,079       428,254  
Fair value of employee stock options
    219,541       411,860       631,401  
Gain on extinguishment of debt
    (19,410 )     -       (19,410 )
Gain on derivative liability
    (1,480,586 )     -       (1,480,586 )
Depreciation
    850       -       850  
Amortization of patent costs
    19,593       -       19,593  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities
                       
Change in prepaid expenses and deposits
    (34,889 )     -       (34,469 )
Other receivables
    (65,122 )     -       (65,122 )
Accrued salaries
    5,453       -       5,453  
Change in accounts payable and accrued expenses
    198,217       10,344       70,750  
Net Cash (Used in) Operating Activities
    (521,785 )     (415,166 )     (1,456,444 )
                         
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
                       
Purchase of equipment
    (25,018 )     -       (25,018 )
Purchase of patents and other intellectual property
    -       (300,000 )     (300,000 )
Discontinued operations
    -       -       418,000  
Net Cash (Used In) Provided by Investing Activities
    (25,018 )     (300,000 )     92,982  
                         
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
                       
Sale of preferred stock and warrants
    -       1,005,000       1,005,000  
Proceeds of warrants exercised for cash
    1,005,000       -       1,005,000  
Proceeds from related party payables
    -       -       125,453  
Repayments of related party payables
    -       -       (125,453 )
Proceeds from short-term notes payable
    64,408       -       64,408  
Repayments of short-term notes payable
    (46,922 )     -       (46,922 )
Repayment of convertible debentures
    (398,873 )     (40,012 )     (438,885 )
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities
    623,613       964,988       1,588,601  
                         
NET INCREASE IN CASH
    76,810       249,822       225,139  
CASH AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD
    345,604       95,782       197,275  
CASH AT END OF PERIOD
  $ 422,414     $ 345,604     $ 422,414  
                         
                         
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF
                       
CASH FLOW INFORMATION
                       
                         
CASH PAID FOR:
                       
Interest
  $ 31,920     $ 14,000     $ 45,920  
Income Taxes
    -       -       -  
                         
NON CASH FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Transfer of investment for dividends payable
  $ -     $ -     $ 186,000  
Purchase of patents for debenture
    -       500,000       500,000  
Conversion of debenture
    10,000       -       10,000  
Options issued to settle accounts payable     3,991       -       3,991  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
 
 
27

 
 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
 
NOTE 1 – DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS
 
Merger - On March 30, 2007 (the "Effective Date"), Prime Acquisition, Inc., a Delaware corporation formed on December 18, 2006 and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Prime Resource, Inc. (the “Registrant”), a Utah Corporation, merged with and into Broadband Maritime Inc. (“Broadband”), a Delaware corporation, ceasing its separate existence (the “Merger”). As a result of the Merger, Broadband is the surviving corporation and the Registrant's only wholly-owned subsidiary and sole operating entity. Until its cessation of operations in June 2007 (discussed below), Broadband was a telecommunications engineering and service company offering turnkey, always-on Internet access to commercial shipping fleets. For purposes of accounting, Broadband is treated as the accounting acquirer and, as such, these consolidated financial statements present the operations of Broadband for all periods presented.
 
In connection with the Merger, the Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant were amended on March 22, 2007, to (1) change its name to "BBM Holdings, Inc." (the “Company”) and (2) increase the total authorized capital stock of the Registrant to 60,000,000 shares of which 50,000,000 shares were designated common stock, no par value, and 10,000,000 shares were designated preferred stock, no par value, 1,454,090 shares of the Preferred Stock were designated Series A Preferred Stock (the "Series A Stock"). Prior to the Merger, the Registrant declared a dividend of one share of Series A Stock per share of Common Stock outstanding. Each share of Series A Stock represents the right to exchange such share for a pro rata share (among the issued and outstanding Series A Stock) of whatever right, title and interest is held by the Registrant in the Units consisting of 58,166 Lightspace Units, each unit consisting of 8 shares and 12 warrants to purchase common stock of Lightspace Corporation, a Delaware corporation (the "Lightspace Securities").
 
In accordance with the Merger Agreement, BBM issued an aggregate of 23,773,217 shares of its Common Stock to the shareholders of Broadband in consideration for the surrender of their Broadband shares. BBM issued one share of its Common Stock per 0.0596 share of Broadband Preferred Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Date, and one share of Common Stock per 59.558 of shares of Broadband Common Stock issued and outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Date. In connection with the Merger, BBM also issued, or reserved for the issuance upon surrender of outstanding warrants or options, warrants and options to purchase an aggregate of 14,979,835 shares of Common Stock in consideration for the surrender of warrants and options to purchase Broadband Common Stock. Each warrant and option to purchase Broadband Common Stock granted and unexercised immediately prior to the Effective Date (a "Broadband Option"), vested or unvested, represents the right to receive an option or warrant, as the case may be, to acquire Common Stock at the rate of one share of Common Stock per 59.559 shares of Broadband Common Stock upon exercise of the Broadband Option. The substituted warrants will retain the exercise period provided for at the time of their original issuance, which in each case was five years. The per share exercise price of the warrants, which ranged from $0.01 to $0.02, has been adjusted proportionately.
 
The Merger (reverse acquisition) described above has been accounted for as a purchase business combination in which Broadband was the acquirer for accounting purposes and the Registrant was the legal acquirer. No goodwill has been recognized since the Registrant was a “shell company.” 
 
Cessation of Operations - On June 5, 2007 the Company announced that it had ceased operations and reduced employment to a small residual force.  The Company committed to this action following a meeting of the Board of Directors on May 31, 2007.  The Company received notification of cancellation of two customer contracts on May 22, 2007 and May 28, 2007.  In addition, the Company’s largest customer indicated to the Company that it would suspend further installations of systems on its vessels for a four month period. The Company also received notification of the cancellation of a third customer contract on June 1, 2007.
 
Based on the cancellations and suspension of installations, the Board of Directors decided that the Company’s installation schedule was severely jeopardized and the ability to raise additional funds for the operations of the Company would be greatly impaired.  The Board directed management to cease operations immediately in order to conserve cash and maximize the value of the Company.  Accordingly, the Company ceased operations effective September 30, 2007 and was reclassified as a development stage enterprise, from the date of cessation forward.

 
 
28

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009

NOTE 1 – DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS (CONTINUED)
 
On August 4, 2009 the Company merged with and into Ohr Pharmaceutical, Inc. (“Ohr”).  Under the terms of the merger agreement Ohr became the surviving corporation in the merger.  Each outstanding share of BBM common stock was converted into one share of Ohr common stock.  Each outstanding share of BBM Series B convertible preferred stock was converted into one share of Ohr Series B convertible preferred stock.  Additionally, all outstanding BBM options and warrants were assumed and converted into equivalent Ohr warrants or options and maintained substantially identical terms.  Finally, each outstanding share of Ohr stock owned by BBM immediately prior to the effective date of the merger ceased to be outstanding and was cancelled and retired.
 
In connection with consummating the Merger, the Company filed a new Certificate of Incorporation in Delaware.  The new Certificate of Incorporation increased the authorized capital stock of the Company to 180,000,000 shares of Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share, and 15,000,000 shares of serial preferred stock, $0.0001 par value per share, of which 6,000,000 shares have been designated as Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, having substantially the same terms as the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock of BBM. The Board of Directors of the Company also adopted the Company’s Bylaws.
 
The Company is a biotechnology rollup company currently focused on development of the Company’s previously acquired compounds. With the addition of a new executive management team in April 2010, the Company has shifted its strategy accordingly to focus on the development of two later stage lead products for the treatment of cancer cachexia and wet-AMD.
 
NOTE 2 - GOING CONCERN
 
The Company's financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable to a going concern which contemplates the realization of assets and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has not yet established an ongoing source of revenues sufficient to cover its operating costs and allow it to continue as a going concern. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company obtaining adequate capital to fund operating losses until it becomes profitable. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations.  The Company has had no revenues and has generated an accumulated deficit of approximately $21,973,993 ($345,245 accumulated during the development stage) as of September 30, 2010.
 
In order to continue as a going concern, the Company will need, among other things, additional capital resources. Management's plan is to obtain such resources for the Company by seeking equity and/or debt financing. However management cannot provide any assurances that the Company will be successful in accomplishing any of its plans.
 
The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to successfully accomplish the plans described in the preceding paragraph and eventually secure other sources of financing and attain profitable operations. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern.
 
NOTE 3 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Material estimates that could change in the near term are impairment assessments, and expenses related to the fair value of warrants and stock issued under cashless exercise of warrants.

 
 
29

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 3 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)
 
Reclassification of Financial Statement Accounts
Certain amounts in the September 30, 2009 financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the presentation in the September 30, 2010 financial statements.
 
Accounting Basis
The Company’s financial statements are prepared using the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.  The Company has elected a September 30 fiscal year end.
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
The Company considers all highly-liquid investments purchased with an original maturity date of three months or less to be cash equivalents.
 
Concentration of Credit Risk
Financial instruments, which potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk, consist principally of cash.   Our cash balances are maintained in accounts held by major banks and financial institutions located in the United States.  The Company occasionally maintains amounts on deposit with a financial institution that are in excess of the federally insured limit of $250,000. The risk is managed by maintaining all deposits in high quality financial institutions. The Company had approximately $145,140 of cash balances in excess of federally insured limits at September 30, 2010.
 
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
In accordance with ASC 820, the carrying value of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and accounts payable approximates fair value due to the short-term maturity of these instruments.  ASC 820 clarifies the definition of fair value, prescribes methods for measuring fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy to classify the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:
 
Level 1-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities available at the measurement date.
 
Level 2-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable, and inputs derived from or corroborated by observable market data.
 
Level 3-Inputs are unobservable inputs which reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions on what assumptions the market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best available information.
 
The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets for cash, accounts receivable, loans payable, and accounts payable and accrued expenses, approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments. The following table presents assets and liabilities that are measured and recognized at fair value as of September 30, 2010, on a non-recurring basis:
 
Assets and liabilities measured at fair
               
value on a recurring and nonrecurring
           
Total
 
basis at September 30, 2010:
           
Carrying
 
Nonrecurring:
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Value
 
Notes payable 
  $ -     $ -     $ (17,486 )   $ (17,486 )
Convertible debenture
    -       -       (51,115 )     (51,115 )
Stock warrant derivative liability
    -       -       (1,387,656 )     (1,387,656 )
    $ -     $ -     $ (1,456,257 )   $ (1,456,257 )
 
 
 
30

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 3 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)
 
Fair Value of Financial Instruments (continued)
A financial instrument's categorization within the valuation hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The following is a description of the valuation methodology used to measure fair value, as well as the general classification of such instruments pursuant to the valuation hierarchy.
 
Notes Payable and Convertible Debenture:     Market prices are not available for the Company's loans nor are market prices of similar loans available. The Company assessed that the fair value of this liability approximates its carrying value.
 
Stock Warrant Derivative Liability:     Market prices are not available for the Company's warrants nor are market prices of similar warrants available. The Company assessed that the fair value of this liability approximates its carrying value.
 
The method described above may produce a current fair value calculation that may not be indicative of net realizable value or reflective of future fair values. If a readily determined market values became available or if actual performance were to vary appreciably from assumptions used, assumptions may need to be adjusted, which could result in material differences from the recorded carrying amounts. The Company believes its method of determining fair value is appropriate and consistent with other market participants. However, the use of different methodologies or different assumptions to value certain financial instruments could result in a different estimate of fair value.
 
The following tables present the fair value of financial instruments as of September 30, 2010, by caption on the condensed balance sheet and by ASC 820 valuation hierarchy described above.
 
 
Notes
   
Convertible
   
Stock Warrant
 
Level 3 Reconciliation:
Payable
   
Debentures
   
Derivative
 
Level 3 assets and liabilities at September 30, 2009:
  $ -     $ (459,988 )   $ -  
Purchases, sales, issuances and settlements (net)
    (17,486 )     408,873       (1,387,656 )
Total level 3 assets and liabilities at September 30, 2010 
  $ (17,486 )   $ (51,115 )   $ (1,387,656 )
 
Property and Equipment
Property and equipment is recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation and amortization is calculated using the straight-line method over the expected useful life of the asset, after the asset is placed in service. The Company generally uses the following depreciable lives for its major classifications of property and equipment:

Description
Useful Lives
Equipment
5 years
 
Derivative Financial Instruments
The Company generally does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to cash-flow risks or market-risks that may affect the fair values of its financial instruments. The Company utilizes various types of financing to fund our business needs, including warrants and other instruments not indexed to our stock. The Company is required to record its derivative instruments at their fair value. Changes in the fair value of derivatives are recognized in earnings in accordance with ASC 815.
 
Advertising
The Company complies with the requirements of ASC 320 in which advertising costs are charged to operations as incurred. Advertising for the years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 were $-0- and $-0-, respectively.

 
 
31

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 3 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)
 
Research and Development
The Company follows the policy of expensing its research and development costs in the period in which they are incurred in accordance with ASC 730, “Accounting for Research and Development Costs”. The Company incurred net research and development expenses of $254,021 and $24,530 during the years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, respectively, which is included in general and administrative expense.
 
On July 20, 2010 the Company applied for a grant under the IRS Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project (QTDP) program.  The application was approved and expenses spent on research and development during the year ended September 30, 2010 totaling $65,122 were approved for reimbursement under the grant program.  This amount has been recorded as a grant receivable and recorded as a reduction in research and development expenses.
 
Share-based Compensation
The Company follows the provisions of ASC 718, “Share-Based Payment.” which requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the income statement based on their fair values.  The Company uses the Black-Scholes pricing model for determining the fair value of stock based compensation.
 
Equity instruments issued to non-employees for goods or services are accounted for at fair value and are marked to market until service is complete or a performance commitment date is reached, whichever is earlier.
 
Loss Per Share
Basic and diluted loss per common share is calculated using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. For the year ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, the Company’s 24,582,193 and 29,826,529 warrants, are excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share as they are anti-dilutive in both cases.
 
Income Taxes
The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse.
 
In July, 2006, the FASB issued ASC 740, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a return. ASC 740 provides guidance on the measurement, recognition, classification and disclosure of tax positions, along with accounting for the related interest and penalties. ASC 740 became effective as of January 1, 2007 and had no impact on the Company’s financial statements.
 
The charge for taxation is based on the results for the year as adjusted for items, which are non-assessable or disallowed. It is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
The Company has evaluated all recent accounting pronouncements issued through September 30, 2010 and their adoption has not had or is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, or statements.

 
 
32

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 4 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT
 
The Company’s property and equipment are comprised of the following on September 30, 2010 and 2009:

   
2010
   
2009
 Equipment
  $ 25,018     $ -
 Accumulated depreciation 
    (850 )     -
 Net Property and Equipment  
  $ 24,168     $ -
 
The equipment is depreciated over its estimated useful life of 5 years under the straight-line method. Depreciation expense for the years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009 was $850 and $-0-, respectively.
 
NOTE 5 – PATENT COSTS
 
Patent costs represent the capitalized purchase price of assets acquired in the secured party sale as part of the Company’s previously announced strategy to create a rollup of undervalued biotechnology companies and assets.  As of September 30, 2010, the Company had purchased $800,000 worth of biotechnology patents and other intellectual property.  In these acquisitions, the Company used approximately $300,000 in cash and issued a $500,000 convertible debenture for the remainder of the cost which is secured by the acquired assets.
 
The Company amortizes the patents over their remaining useful lives.  During the years ended September 30, 2010 and September 30, 2009 the Company recognized $19,593 and $-0- in amortization on the patents.  The expense has been recorded as research and development expense.
 
Company management performed an impairment analysis as of September 30, 2010 to evaluate the carrying cost of the patents.  The Company determined that as of September 30, 2010 the carrying costs of the patents do not exceed fair value, thus no impairment has been recognized.
 
NOTE 6 – CONVERTIBLE DEBT
 
During the year ended September 30, 2009, the Company issued an 11% convertible note in the amount of $500,000, due June 20, 2011. Under the terms of the note, the Company paid $180,000 on December 15, 2009, and quarterly payments of $25,000 commencing on March 30, 2010, each of which shall be applied first towards the satisfaction of accrued interest and then towards the satisfaction of principal. All unpaid principal and accrued interest on the notes is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at the election of the purchasers at any time at the conversion price of $0.40 per share.
 
During the years ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, the Company accrued $19,828 and $25,797 in interest and $398,156 and $40,012 in principle on the convertible debt, respectively.   On June 23, 2010 the holder of the note converted $10,000 of principal into 25,000 shares of common stock at $0.40 per share.  The balance of the convertible note as of September 30, 2010 is $51,115.  Accrued interest as of September 30, 2010 totaled $1,863.
 
NOTE 7 – DERIVATIVE LIABILITY AND FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
 
On January 15, 2010 the Company issued 5,583,336 warrants to warrant holders that had exercised warrants during the period at $0.18.  The Company used the Black-Scholes option pricing model to calculate the fair market value of these warrants.  Using the assumptions in the table below, the Company calculated a fair value of $0.51 per warrant.

 
 
33

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 7 – DERIVATIVE LIABILITY AND FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS (CONTINUED)

Stock Price at Valuation Date
  $ 0.52  
Exercise (Strike) Price
  $ 0.55  
Dividend Yield
    0.00 %
Years to Maturity
    5.00  
Risk-free Rate
    1.35 %
Volatility
    270 %
 
Effective July 31, 2009, the Company adopted FASB ASC Topic No. 815-40 which defines determining whether an instrument (or embedded feature) is solely indexed to an entity’s own stock. The exercise price of the 5,583,336 warrants issued to on January 15, 2010 are subject to “reset” provisions in the event the Company subsequently issues common stock, stock warrants, stock options or convertible debt with a stock price, exercise price or conversion price lower than $0.55. If these provisions are triggered, the exercise price of all their warrants will be reduced.  As a result, the warrants are not considered to be solely indexed to the Company’s own stock and are not afforded equity treatment.
 
The total fair value of the warrants, amounting to $2,868,242 has been recognized as a derivative liability on the date of issuance with all future changes in the fair value of these warrants being recognized in earnings in the Company’s statement of operations under the caption “Other income (expense) – Gain (loss) on warrant derivative liability” until such time as the warrants are exercised or expire.  Because these warrants were issued in conjunction with common stock that had been exchanged for warrants with an exercise price of $0.18, the fair value on the date of issuance includes the net cash proceeds from the sale of stock of $1,005,000 and the fair value of $0.18 warrants being forfeited valued on the date of exercise at $2,867,856.
 
The Company’s only asset or liability measured at fair value on a recurring basis is its derivative liability associated with 5,583,336 warrants to purchase common stock issued on January 15, 2010.  ASC 815 requires Company management to assess the fair market value of the warrants at each reporting period and recognize any change in the fair market value of the warrants as an other income or expense item.  At September 30, 2010, the Company revalued the warrants using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the assumptions in the table below and determined that the Company’s liability associated with this derivative liability decreased by $1,480,586 from their originally recorded value of $2,868,242 to $1,387,656.  The Company recognized a corresponding gain of $1,480,586 on derivative liability in conjunction with this revaluation.

Stock Price at Valuation Date
  $ 0.25 to $0.60  
Exercise (Strike) Price
  $ 0.55 to $0.60  
Dividend Yield
    0.00 %
Years to Maturity
    4.33  
Risk-free Rate
 
1.15% to 2.60
%
Volatility
 
132% to 276
%
 
The following shows the changes in the level three liability measured on a recurring basis for the year ended September 30, 2010:

Balance, September 30, 2009
  $ -  
Derivative for warrants issued during the year
    2,868,242  
Derivative gain
    (1,480,586 )
Balance, September 30, 2010
  $ 1,387,656  

 
 
34

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 8 – CAPITAL STOCK
 
On June 3, 2009, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the Company sold 5,583,336 series B preferred shares with 5,583,336 Series G Warrants and 5,583,336 Series F Warrants attached. Each share of preferred stock has the same voting rights of common shareholders and has a conversion feature where series B preferred shares can be converted into common shares at the conversion rate of 1 to 1. Warrants included in each unit sold have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.18.
 
On December 15, 2009, investors exercised 5,583,336 Series G warrants via a cashless exchange for 4,547,238 shares of the Company’s common stock.
 
On January 15, 2010, the Company completed a $1,005,000 financing in which the company issued 5,583,336 common shares to holders of the series F Warrants who exercised their warrants at an exercise price of $0.18. Additionally, as an inducement to the holders to exercise the Warrants, the Company issued 5,583,336 Series H warrants to the Series F warrant holders who exercised their Series F warrants.. The Series H Warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.55.
 
On June 23, 2010 the holder of the convertible debenture elected to convert $10,000 of the remaining principal balance into 25,000 common shares at $0.40 per share pursuant to the conversion rights of the note.
 
On August 5, 2010 the Company issued 50,000 shares of its common stock to a consultant for services to be provided to the Company.
 
NOTE 9 - WARRANTS
 
The Company has determined the estimated value of the warrants granted to employees and non-employees in exchange for services and financing expenses using the Black-Scholes pricing model and the following assumptions: expected term of 3-5 years, exercise price of $0.55 and $0.60, a risk free interest rate of 1.15-2.60%, a dividend yield of 0% and volatility of 132-276%. The amount of the expense charged to operations for warrants granted in exchange for services was $129,691 and $27,079 during the year ended September 30, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
Between October 29 and December 4, 2009, the Company issued a total of 236,000 warrants for services rendered to the Company.  In conjunction with this issuance, the Company recognized $88,562 in consulting expense.
 
On April 9, 2010 the Company granted 10,000 warrants as payment for an outstanding accounts payable balance of $3,991.
 
On June 22, 2010 the Company authorized the issuance of 93,000 warrants to be issued for services to be provided to the Company.  Of these authorized warrants, 90,000 were issued on June 23, 2010 once the contract for services was finalized. These warrants have a 5 year term with a strike price of $0.50. The remaining 3,000 warrants were issued September 2, 2010. These warrants have a 3 year term with a strike price of $0.50.  The combined value of these options is $41,129 and was expensed as research and development expense.

 
 
35

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009
 
NOTE 9 – WARRANTS (CONTINUED)
 
Below is a table summarizing the warrants issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2010.
 

Date
 
Number
   
Exercise
   
Contractual
   
Expiration
   
Value if
 
Issued
 
Outstanding
   
Price
   
Life (Years)
   
Date
   
Exercised
 
Balance 10/01/08
    13,509,857       1.18       5    
Various
      15,941,631  
03/20/2009
    5,000,000       0.50       5    
03/31/2014
      2,500,000  
06/03/2009
    11,166,672       0.18       5    
06/03/2014
      2,010,001  
09/30/2009
    150,000       0.40       5    
06/30/2014
      60,000  
Expired
    -       -       -       -       -  
Balance  09/30/09
    29,826,529       0.69       -       -       20,511,632  
10/09/2009
    88,000       0.50       5    
10/29/2014
      44,000  
11/09/2009
    18,000       0.50       5    
11/09/2014
      9,000  
12/04/2009
    130,000       0.60       2    
12/04/2011
      78,000  
12/15/2009
    (5,583,336 )     0.18       -       -       (1,005,000 )
01/15/2010
    5,583,336       0.55       5    
01/15/2015
      3,070,835  
01/15/2010
    (5,583,336 )     0.18       -       -       (1,005,000 )
04/13/2010
    10,000       0.55       5    
04/13/2015
      5,500  
07/23/2010
    93,000       0.50       3    
07/23/2013
      46,500  
Expired
    -       -       -       -       -  
Balance  09/30/10
    24,582,193       0.89       -       -       21,755,466  

NOTE 10 – OPTIONS
 
On April 12, 2010 the Company granted 1,000,000 warrants to employees as part of its 2009 stock option plan.  The Company used the Black-Scholes option pricing model to calculate the fair market value of these warrants.  Using the assumptions in the table below, the Company calculated a fair value of $0.40 per warrant. Of the 1,000,000 options issued, 520,000 vested upon issuance and the remaining 480,000 will vest over the 5 year life of the options.  As of September 30, 2010 the Company recognized compensation expense of $219,541 for the vested options.

Stock Price at Valuation Date
  $ 0.40  
Exercise (Strike) Price
  $ 0.50  
Dividend Yield
    0.00 %
Years to Maturity
    5.00  
Risk-free Rate
    2.60 %
Volatility
    277 %
 
Below is a table summarizing the options issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2010.

Date
   
Number
   
Exercise
   
Contractual
   
Expiration
   
Value if
Issued
   
Outstanding
   
Price
   
Life (Years)
   
Date
   
Exercised
Prior 10/1/2008
   
-
   
$
-
   
-
   
-
   
$
-
4/9/2009
   
579,141
     
0.65
   
5
   
4/9/2013
     
376,442
9/30/2009
   
579,141
     
0.65
   
5
   
4/9/2013
     
376,442
4/12/2010
   
1,000,000
     
0.50
   
5
   
4/12/2015
     
500,000
9/30/2010
   
1,579,141
   
$
0.56
   
-
   
-
   
$
876,442
 
 
 
36

 
OHR PHARMACEUTICAL, INC.
(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
September 30, 2010 and 2009

NOTE 11 – INCOME TAXES
 
ASC 740 requires the reduction of deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. In the Company’s opinion, it is uncertain whether they will generate sufficient taxable income in the future to fully utilize the net deferred tax asset. Accordingly, a valuation allowance equal to the deferred tax asset has been recorded. The total deferred tax asset is calculated by multiplying a 41% marginal tax rate by the cumulative NOL of $2,504,244. The total valuation allowance is equal to the total deferred tax asset.
 
The tax effects of significant items comprising the Company's net deferred taxes as of September 30, 2010 and 2009 were as follows: 

   
2010
   
2009
 
Cumulative NOL
  $ 2,504,244     $ 1,518,035  
                 
Deferred Tax assets: